Athens International Film Festival
aiff

THE IMMORTAL STORY / UNE HISTOIRE IMMORTELLE

25/09/2021, 17:00, DANAOS
1/10/2021, 19:45, STELLA

Director: Orson Welles
It only lasts an hour and yet countless articles have been written through years about Welles’ fairytale adaptation of Karen Blixen’s sublime novel in which the final wish of a lonely elderly aristocrat nearing the end of his life is to prove that he can turn an old naval myth into reality. The triumph of fantasy and romanticism will overwhelmingly prevail over realism in this beautiful diamond of a film which is made all the more lovelier by Jeanne Moreau. Double feature with “Too Much Johnson".

FRANCE | 1968 | COLOR | DCP | 62’ | ENGLISH

Orson Welles first colour film opens with Erik Satie’s notes. It’s no coincidence that the forebear of minimalism, who wanted to “kill” Romanticism (stealing part of its heart) is the sound guide. In this one-hour long TV film that Welles made for French television, with quite a lot productive affordability – that shows in the final product – another rich, isolated, puppet muster, portrayed by Welles, who “despises prophecies”, and is interested “only in facts” and turning a sailor tale into a real story.

For those that fiction means nothing compared to “based on true events”, Welles took a Karen Blixen short story and left his unforgettable, sardonic mark. I.D.

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DIRECTOR: Orson Welles
SCREENWRITERS: Louise de Vilmorin, Orson Welles
DoP: Willy Kurant
EDITORS: Claude Farny, Françoise Garnault, Yolande Maurette, Marcelle Pluet
PRINCIPAL CAST: Jeanne Moreau, Orson Welles, Roger Coggio, Norman Eshley



    Publication date: 2021-09-14 15:07:49

    MR. ARKADIN

    MR. ARKADIN

    Of analogous structure and almost as worthy as “Citizen Kane” in baroque grandeur, “Mr. Arcadin'' leads the audience through an amazing narrative labyrinth about the case of a notorious tycoon with a dark past and the opportunist who undertakes the task of investigating his enigmatic life, though he ends up putting his own life in danger. Having endured the devastating intervention of producers, and having been released throughout the years in different versions, a digitally restored copy of the version that is considered closest to the director's original vision will be screened. Introduction by Tasos Melemenidis, head of program at CINOBO (27/09).

    OTHELLO

    OTHELLO

    In a career full of misfortune, punishment, tough pleas, and commercial fiascos, “The Tragedy of Othello: The Moor of Venice” and the turbulent filming that lasted four years are indicative of the director's obstinate willingness to go to the edge of the world to achieve his vision. The genius of Welles behind the camera brings one of the Bard's darkest plays to life, in a stunning black and white composition as this admirable cinematic craftsmanship full of heart, ardour and blood, to this day, constitutes the sacred manual of how to make films and how to watch them. Winner of the Grand Prize of the Cannes Festival in 1952. Introduction by Dimitris Karantzas actor and director (23/09).

    THE STRANGER

    THE STRANGER

    An example of the inconceivably artistic greatness of its director, “The Stranger” remains forgotten at the bottom of a superb filmography, but continues to be counted amongst some of the greatest noirs ever made. From every aspect, the most commercially successful film of the director's early period is a post-expressionistic classic, impressive because of the ingenuous way it was filmed, foreshadowing the aesthetics of “The Third Man”

    THE TRIAL

    THE TRIAL

    Film noir meets German expressionism in this dystopian adaptation of Kafka's “The Trial” by the only director who could take on such a weighty task. Anthony Perkins exhibits his great acting skills in an ode of a film showing the crushing of the individual at the hands of impersonal authoritarian systems. Most people may consider “Citizen Kane” Welles' best film, however, “The Trial” remains one of his most commanding and formalistically daring films. Introduction by journalist Tina Mandilara (24/09).

    TOO MUCH JOHNSON

    TOO MUCH JOHNSON

    Orson Welles' first film project remains an autonomous, vivid and full of pizzaz tribute to silent comedy. A must-see screening for every scholar and fan of the director as it features an on-screen parade of his most determining influences throughout the 66 unedited minutes of its duration. The film will be screened prior to the main screening "The Immortal Story / Une Histoire Immortelle".